stomach magic


paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)
An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

(Source: retro-vintage-photography.blogspot.com, via hermosanikita)

— 1 day ago with 1151 notes

7knotwind:

JERRY SALTZ
advice for artists

— 1 day ago with 56885 notes
fairy-wren:

white-faced whistling ducks
(photo by halex)

fairy-wren:

white-faced whistling ducks

(photo by halex)

(via earthlynation)

— 3 days ago with 1357 notes
"We’re often wrong at predicting who or what will transform us. Encountering certain people, books, music, places or ideas… at just the right time can immediately make our lives happier, richer, more beautiful, resonant or meaningful. When it happens, we feel a kind of instant love for them that is both deep and abiding. Now and then it can be something as trifling as a children’s book, a returned telephone call, or a night at a seaside bar in Mykonos."
— 3 days ago with 120 notes
"I had a teacher I liked who used to say good fiction’s job was to comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable. I guess a big part of serious fiction’s purpose is to give the reader, who like all of us is sort of marooned in her own skull, to give her imaginative access to other selves."
David Foster Wallace (via is-ventus)
— 3 days ago with 31 notes

supersonicart:

Suzanne Walsh.

Artist Suzanne Walsh creates her work via detailed wood burning and soft washes of paint.  See more of her work below:

Read More

— 3 days ago with 1056 notes
dammar:

Ah… childhood memories.

dammar:

Ah… childhood memories.

(Source: ribbonsandhyssop, via iloverainandcoffee)

— 3 days ago with 75 notes
margadirube:

dig-image:Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948) Roofline of Lacock Abbey, circa 1835-1839 2008 Gelatin silver print 93.7 x 74.9 cm (36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in.) The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Gift of the Artist © Hiroshi Sugimoto

margadirube:

dig-image:Hiroshi Sugimoto (Japanese, born 1948)
Roofline of Lacock Abbey, circa 1835-1839
2008 Gelatin silver print 93.7 x 74.9 cm (36 7/8 x 29 1/2 in.)
The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Gift of the Artist © Hiroshi Sugimoto

(via iloverainandcoffee)

— 3 days ago with 102 notes